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Bachelor of Arts in Translation Studies

Statement of purpose
BA in Translation Studies is designed for students who aspire to learn how to generate original or translated content that effectively communicates ideas and messages to a variety of audiences. The program instructs students in the art of translation and interpreting, and trains students to accurately reproduce cultural, economic, legal, and technical texts in English/Russian/Kazakh. The program aims to improve students’ command of English and of a second foreign language, by developing their lexical repertoire and polishing their writing style. The program emphasizes critical thinking, operative communication skills and strong interpersonal skills that empower students to be adaptable communicators with real world experience. It also provides the opportunity to deepen mastery of specific skill sets through minoring in PR, Public Administration, Law, Marketing, International Relations, etc. This prepares students for a wide range of careers in the academic, corporate, administrative, and non-governmental sectors, including publishing, media, business, digital industries, etc.

The B.A. in Translation Studies shall:

  • Prepare highly competent language professionals for field-related careers in Kazakhstan and abroad;
  • Provide an early entry into the job market, as well as open further learning prospects in the humanities and social sciences;
  • Equip our students with the necessary knowledge and skills of translation and interpretation, literary appreciation, and linguistics analysis;
  • Encourage the students to use modern technology that can enhance their language education and careers.

Program learning outcomes
Students of this program will be able to:

  • Demonstrate effective operational proficiency in English (CERF level B2-C1) and be independent users of a second foreign language (CERF level B1);
  • Demonstrate effective communication skills and proficiency in oral, written, and professional English in a variety of social and academic contexts and genres;
  • Demonstrate core academic knowledge of major literary texts in English and in their second foreign/professional language;
  • Show comprehensive understanding of the properties and analysis of human language, and the theories and practice of language use;
  • Show comprehension of current theoretical thinking and linguistic theories on translation, and their relation to the practice of translation;
  • Demonstrate ability to draw on extra-linguistic knowledge to make sound decisions in translation;
  • Demonstrate an accurate and faithful translation/interpretation in a target text.
  • Demonstrate accuracy in translation/interpretation at all linguistic levels (phonemic, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic).
  • Show openness to and respect for the variety of cultures, religions and political affiliations that they come in contact with
  • Adapt and transfer a range of subject specific and generic skills, including high order conceptual, research, critical, and lifelong learning skills of value in graduate studies and/or employment.

BATS Curriculum
Requirements for the BA in Translation Studies are as follows:

Category of Courses Credits ECTS
General Education Requirements 28 46
Program Foundation Requirements 20 33
Program Foundation Electives 49 81
Program Specialization Requirements 5 8
Program Specialization Electives 27 45
Other Graduation Requirements 17 27
Total Required for Graduation 146 240

BATS Program Plan
The following tables are a sample program of study to finish the BA in Translation Studies degree in four years.

1st Year
 

 

Fall Semester

 

Cr ECTS     Spring Semester Cr ECTS
LING 1101 Fundamentals of  Linguistics 3 5 TRN 2101 Introduction to Translation 3 5
ENG 1110 Academic Listening and Note-Taking 3 5 ENG/GEN 1100 Academic English Speaking 3 5
ENG 1120 Academic Reading and Writing 1 3 5 ENG 1121 Academic Reading and Writing 2 3 5
GEN 1000 Modern History of Kazakhstan 3 5 GEN/OPM 1300

or

GEN/OPM 2301

 

Information and Communication Technologies or Business Computer Applications 3 5
KAZ/ RUS xxxx Kazakh/Russian 3 5 KAZ/ RUS xxxx Kazakh/Russian 3 5
GE elective (Category B) 3 5 GER xxxx GE Elective (Category B) 3 5
GER xxxx Physical training 2 2 GER xxxx Physical training 2 2
  TOTAL 20 32   TOTAL 20 32
2nd Year
 

 

Fall Semester

 

Cr ECTS     Spring Semester Cr ECTS
TRN 3101 Introduction to Interpreting 3 5 ENG 3102 Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition 3 5
TRN 3201 Commercial Translation 3 5 KAZ/ RUS xxxx FL elective (Chinese) 3 5
LING 2101 Language and its Structure I 3 5 LING 2201 Language and its Structure II 3 5
ENG 2101 Introduction to Literary Studies 3 5 LING 2202 Latin 3 5
KAZ/ RUS 22xx Professional Kazakh/Russian 2 3 TRN 3202 Legal Translation 3 5
GEN xxxx GE elective (Category C) 3 5 GEN/ IRL 2510 Introduction to Philosophy or Principles of Ethics 3 5
GEN xxxx Physical training 2 2 GEN xxxx Physical training 2 2
  TOTAL 19 30   TOTAL 20 32
 
 
Summer 1 Semester Cr ECTS
TRN 2202 Translation and Interpreting Internship I 2 3
  TOTAL 2 3
3rd Year
 
 
Fall Semester
 
Cr ECTS     Spring Semester Cr ECTS
TRN xxxx Interpreting elective 2 3 LING 33xx Linguistics elective 3 5
TRN xxxx Translation elective 3 5 ENG33xx English Rhetoric elective 3 5
ENG 3303 Business and Professional Writing 3 5 TRNxxxx Translation elective 3 5
LING xxxx Linguistics elective 3 5 CHN/ RUS xxxx FL elective (Chinese) 3 5
ENG xxxx English Literature elective 3 5 xxxx Other program elective or minor 3 5
CHN/ RUS xxxx FL elective (Chinese) 3 5 xxxx Other program elective or minor 3 5
ENG xxxx English Literature elective 3 5
  TOTAL 17 33   TOTAL 18 30
  Summer 1 Semester
 
Cr ECTS
TRN 4104 Translation and Interpreting Internship II 2 4
  TOTAL 2 4
4th Year
  Fall Semester Cr ECTS     Spring Semester Cr ECTS
TRN 4103 Senior Project in Translation   3    5 CHN RUS xxxx FL elective (Chinese)     3    5
CHN RUS xxxx FL elective (Chinese)   3    5 xxxx Other program elective or minor     3    5
xxxx Other program elective or minor   3    5 TRN4203 Thesis 1     2    5
xxxx Other program elective or minor   3    5 TRN4202 Comprehensive Examination     1    3
TRN xxxx Interpreting elective   2    3 TRN 4201 Translation and Interpreting Internship III     2    4
  TOTAL   14    23     TOTAL   11     22

 Total for program: 146 credits

TRANSLATION AND INTERPETING

TRN2101 Introduction to Translation (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Completion of (or exemption from) all English Foundation level courses, evidence of proficiency in Russian.  
Subject to approval by the program coordinator, students who do not speak Russian but are proficient in Kazakh or another Central Asian or European language may also meet the prerequisites.

This is the core prerequisite course for students in the Translation and Interpreting Minor.  The course introduces the basic principles of translation from Russian into English and vice-versa, with special emphasis on translation history and theory, textual analysis, vocabulary building, systematic research, and team work.  The course provides an overview of the translator’s profession in Central Asia and throughout the world and at the same time hones the skills involved in solving practical translation problems.  Students are encouraged to analyze what “works” about their own translations, what doesn’t work, and why.

TRN3101 Introduction to Interpreting (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TRN 2101 Introduction to Translation and GEN 1100 English Speaking and GEN 1120 Academic Reading & Writing 1 courses with evidence of Russian proficiency.   
This course introduces the special nature of interpreting (translating orally) and the particular skills the interpreter must develop.  It offers an overview of the responsibilities of interpreters in judicial, commercial, political, or educational settings.  Extensive practice is included in sight translation and in simultaneous as well as consecutive interpreting.

TRN3201 Commercial Translation (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TRN 2101 Introduction to Translation and GEN 1100 and GEN 1120 with evidence of Russian proficiency.
This course examines the particular characteristics of business texts, such as commercial correspondence, company policy documents, advertising copy and product-related literature.  The specialized vocabulary and conventions governing such texts are studied.  Careful attention is paid to the translator’s responsibility to the client.  Practice is given in translating a wide variety of authentic texts.  Students continue to focus on basic principles of translation, with special emphasis on theory, textual analysis, vocabulary building, systematic research, and team work.

TRN3202 Legal Translation (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TRN 2101  Introduction to Translation and GEN 1100 and GEN 1120 with evidence of Russian proficiency.
This course examines the particular characteristics of legal texts, such as legal correspondence, contracts, official documents, law enforcement and other legal documents.  The specialized vocabulary and conventions governing such texts are studied.  Careful attention is paid to the translator’s responsibility to the client.  Practice is given in translating a wide variety of authentic texts.  Students continue to focus on basic principles of translation, with special emphasis on theory, textual analysis, vocabulary building, systematic research, and team work.

TRN3203 Translation from Informational Media (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TRN 2101 Introduction to Translation and GEN 1100 and GEN 1120 with evidence of Russian proficiency.

This course delves into materials taken from newspapers, magazines, and other media in print and online.  Journalistic practices in English and Russian or Kazakh will be compared and contrasted.  Special emphasis will be given to the vocabulary of current events, public issues, and news reporting.  Students continue to focus on basic principles of translation, with special emphasis on theory, textual analysis, vocabulary building, systematic research, and team work.

TRN3204 Technology for Translation (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TRN 2101 Introduction to Translation and GEN 1100 and GEN 1120 with evidence of Russian proficiency.
This course is designed to introduce students to the technology available to assist translating practice and to familiarize them with modern systems and software to support the translation process. Students will also explore and practice relevant skills and knowledge including machine translation, subtitling, editing and formatting tools that support certain translating tasks commonly needed in the industry locally and globally.

TRN3205 Literary Translation in Prose (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TRN2101 Introduction to Translation
Advanced seminar-style course on literary translation in prose, including the most common theoretical and practical problems of artistic translation and the techniques and strategies that translators employ to produce high-quality texts that faithfully serve the original and at the same time have artistic merit in their own right.  Emphasis on linguistic, cultural, and critical contexts and on developing competencies, including studying different translations of the same work and then practicing (and theorizing) translations of one’s own.  Texts restricted to prose fiction and drama.

TRN3206 Literary Translation in Verse (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TRN2101 Introduction to Translation
Advanced seminar-style course on literary translation in verse, including the most common theoretical and practical problems of artistic translation and the techniques and strategies that translators employ to produce high-quality texts that both faithfully serve the original and have artistic merit in their own right.  Emphasis on linguistic, cultural, and critical contexts and on developing competencies, including studying different translations of the same work and then practicing (and theorizing) translations of one’s own.  Significant emphasis on poetics, specifically on mastering verse forms and conventions.

TRN3301 Workshop: Consecutive Interpreting (2 credits)
Prerequisite: TRN2101 Introduction to Translation
A practical, workshop style course on the styles and techniques of consecutive (sequential) interpreting. Differs from a topic course in its emphasis on practice over theory, providing opportunities to improve consecutive interpreting skills in a variety of situations and contexts.

TRN3302 Workshop: Simultaneous Interpreting (2 credits)
Prerequisite: TRN 2101 Introduction to Translation
A practical, workshop style course on the skill of simultaneous interpreting.  Differs from a topics course in its emphasis on practice over theory, with opportunities to improve simultaneous interpreting skills in a variety of situations and contexts and through the medium of various technologies.

TRN4101 Topics in Translation (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TRN 2101 Introduction to Translation and completion of all four Academic English courses and Russian proficiency.
This advanced course focuses on particular topics in translation, including both practical topics (such as translation in the health care or tourism industries, conference interpreting, and movie subtitling) and theoretical topics (such as the history of translation or the role of translation in globalization). Topics vary from semester to semester.

TRN4102 Topics in Interpreting (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TRN 2101 Introduction to Translation and/or completion of all four Academic English courses and Russian proficiency.

This advanced course focuses on particular topics in interpreting, including both practical topics (such as interpreting in the health care or tourism industries, conference interpreting, and movie subtitling) and theoretical topics.  Topics vary from semester to semester.

TRN4103 Senior Project in Translation (3 credits)
Prerequisite: TRN 2101 Introduction to Translation and at least three other electives courses from the Minor   
This course is restricted to students completing a Minor in Translation and Interpreting Studies. Students will develop a semester-long translation project in consultation with the instructor and/or program coordinator.  The final translation may include a written defense reflecting on the student’s translation principles or analyzing particular translation problems.

TRN2202 Translation and Interpreting Internship I (2 credits/3 ECTS)
Prerequisite: TRN 2101 Introduction to Translation, TRN3201 Commercial Translation
Practice in translation in a professional area. Development of specialized glossaries.

TRN4104 Translation and Interpreting Internship II (2 credits/4 ECTS)
Prerequisite: TRN 2101 Introduction to Translation, TRN 3101 Introduction to Interpreting
Supervised training in a business firm, government office, or translation agency. The course involves weekly discussions of specific texts and problems arising from the field work experience. The internship includes written and laboratory assignments.

TRN4201 Translation and Interpreting Internship III (2 credits/4 ECTS))
Prerequisite: Completion of at least 12 credits of Translation courses
Real experience in a translation agency, an in-house translation department, or any other business/government entity needing translation services. The internship leads to a report.

TRN4202 Comprehensive Examination (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Completion of at least 128 credits of coursework 
Students are required to take the state examination before the awarding of a degree.

TRN4203 Thesis (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Completion of at least 128 credits of coursework 
The writing of an individual and independent bachelor thesis, according to academically established practice. Independent research is supervised by faculty members.

ENGLISH LITERATURE

ENG1102 Mythology and Folklore (3 credits)
Prerequisite: none
This course looks at mythology and folklore in order to better understand and give a broader perspective of human nature.  These stories, which have withstood the test of time, reveal something true and eternal about the human condition.  Students will read, discuss, and analyze from both historical and modern perspectives.  By the end of this course students will be able to read critically and analyze texts for deeper meaning. Students will be able to extract themes and motifs from their reading and apply those ideas to other stories and contexts.

ENG2101 Introduction to Literary Studies (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG1120 Academic Reading and Writing 1
This course uses a meaningful range of literary texts to introduce the main genres and central topics of literary studies.  Its object is to develop a well-rounded general understanding of the literary arts, including their historical aspects and the basic terminology used in their analysis and interpretation.  The texts will model poetry, prose, and drama, while the coursework will focus on the methodical investigation of plot, character, setting, and symbolism, as well as on essential poetic, narrative, and dramatic structures and techniques.

ENG2201 Introduction to British Literature (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG2101 Introduction to Literary Studies
An introduction to the literature of the British Isles through an analysis of its major continuing themes, such as the evolution of regional and class identities, the legacies of industrial revolution, colonialism, and empire, and the wider relation of Britain to Europe and the world. Analysis and interpretation of relevant texts and media, covering a variety of genres and touching on topics in language, culture, politics, economics, and intellectual history.  Some emphasis on regional literatures within the British Isles.

ENG2202 Introduction to American Literature (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG2101 Introduction to Literary Studies

An introduction to American literature through an analysis of its major continuing themes, such as the meaning of freedom, the place of nature and the wilderness in the American mind, urban-rural dichotomies, and issues of race, class, and gender identity.  Analysis and interpretation of relevant texts and media, covering a variety of genres and touching on topics in language, culture, politics, economics, and intellectual history.  Some emphasis on regional literature.

ENG2204 Introduction to Classical Literature (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG210 1Introduction to Literary Studies
The course introduces to best works of Greek and Roman literature. It aims to familiarize students with the culture and history of the classical era, explore the literature’s important themes and issues, and develop critical reading and writing skills. The course contains readings, activities, and projects.

ENG2206 Introduction to poetry and great poets (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG2101 Introduction to Literary Studies
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the complexity, artistry and traditions that inform poetry the course aims to provide a critical vocabulary for poetry appreciation, analysis, and study of this literary form. The course emphasizes close reading of the texts, and there will be frequent writing assignments.

ENG3301 Masterpieces of World Literature (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG2101 Introduction to Literary Studies
This course is an attempt to overview the development of world literature. Each class will be dedicated to a significant book that challenged the received literary conventions and paved the way to new directions in literature. It offers students the opportunity to read excerpts from works that are considered landmark classics.

ENG3302 Introduction to Contemporary Literature (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG2101 Introduction to Literary Studies
A general introduction to Anglophone and non-Anglophone literature in English translation since the year 2000.  The emphasis is on topics relevant to the contemporary world, such as changing social, economic, and gender relations.  Analysis and interpretation of relevant texts and media, covering a variety of genres and touching on topics in language, culture, politics, economics, and intellectual history.

ENG4101 Topics in Literature (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG2101 Introduction to Literary Studies
This course delves in more detail into a particular topic in literature, or in literature in relation to other arts.  The topic may focus on a genre, such as the novel, short story, or lyric poem; on an historical period, such as Romantic, Modernist, or Post-Colonial; on a particular movement or approach, such as Realism or Symbolism; or on an individual writer or poet, such as J.R.R. Tolkien or Emily Dickinson.  The course may also single out a national literature (either Anglophone or non-Anglophone in English translation) or another art form related to literature, including film, painting, performance, and online media.

ENGLISH RHETORICS

ENG3102 Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition
Prerequisite: ENG/GEN1121 Academic Reading and Writing II
This course introduces students to the field of writing studies. It presents key concepts, principles, traditions and discussions that define the field of rhetoric and composition, surveying major texts, movements, issues and methodologies.

ENG3303 Business and Professional Writing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG3102 Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition
A practical, workshop style course in the types and techniques of business and professional writing in English, including commercial correspondence, reports, policy documents, advertising copy, and product-related literature. Strengthens skills necessary to communicate effectively in a variety of business and professional situations and in both oral and written modes. Corresponds to courses in Commercial Translation.

ENG3304 Legal Writing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG3102 Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition
A practical, workshop style course in the types and techniques of legal writing in English, such as legal correspondence, contracts, official documents, law enforcement, and related documents. Emphasis on acquiring the vocabulary and mastering the conventions that govern legal texts, with additional emphasis on the “plain English” movement in legal writing. Corresponds to courses in Legal Translation.

ENG3305 Technical Writing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG3102 Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition
A practical, workshop style course in the types and techniques of writing for technical manuals in English, including skills of description, instruction, and analysis.  Emphasis on acquiring technical vocabulary and mastering the conventions that govern technical brochures. Corresponds to courses in Technical Translation.

ENG3306 Introduction to Creative Writing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG3102 Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition
An introduction to imaginative writing, concentrating on the mastery of language and creative expression in different genres. The course includes analysis of literary models (professional writings in each genre), individual and class criticism of work by established writers, and lecture on and discussion of literary techniques in each genre.

ENG3307 Workshop in Creative Writing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG3102 Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition
This writing course is designed to teach students basic strategies for gathering ideas for, writing, critically reading, and revising prose (primarily fiction. It involves discussion of work by students and established writers.

ENG3308 Writing for Films (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG3102 Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition
This course familiarizes students with foundations of screenwriting.  Coursework involves reading relevant dramatic and cinematic theory, studying produced screenplays, and completing weekly writing assignments.

ENG4102 Special Topic in Writing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG3102 Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition
This course delves in more detail into a particular topic in writing. The topics are confined to specialized teaching interests of faculty and thus will vary.

LINGUISTICS

LING1101 Fundamentals of Linguistics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: none
This course will provide students with an overview of linguistics, the scientific study of language. How can we analyze the different parts of language such as sounds (phonology), parts of words (morphology), word meaning (semantics), and grammar (syntax)? How do people use language in conversation with each other (pragmatics and discourse analysis)? These questions and more will be explored in this course, which aims to introduce students to the exciting diversity of world languages and the basics of linguistic analysis.

Prerequisite: none

LING1201 Child Language Development (2 credits)
Prerequisite: ENG1120 Academic Reading and Writing 1; LING1101 Fundamentals of Linguistics
This course will focus on first language acquisition in infancy and childhood. We will cover the progression of language development in each of the traditional areas of linguistic analysis: phonology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. The course will be focused on experimental research in typical language acquisition and on different theories that strive to explain the underlying cognitive and linguistic mechanisms at work in an early learner.

LING1202/GEN/DA2204 Language in Society (3 credits)
Prerequisite: none
This course examines the role of language in human social interaction and how language relates to socio-economic status, gender, age and social identity. Students are introduced to analysis of sociolinguistic data to understand relations between language and society. Students are also introduced to linguistic diversity in Kazakhstan and the world and implications of language contact for language loss and language change.

LING2101 Language and its structure I: Phonetics and Phonology (3 credits)
Prerequisite: LING1101 Fundamentals of Linguistics
Introduction to the nature and patterning of sounds in human language. The students will be familiarized with articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and basic phonological analysis, focusing on cross-language typology and comparison. The class is aimed at hands-on development of practical skills, including IPA transcription, field techniques, and digital speech analysis. Prerequisite:

LING2201 Language and its structure II: Morphology and Syntax (3 credits) 
Prerequisite: LING2101 Language and its structure I: Phonetics and Phonology
Morphology deals with the internal structure of words and their meaningful parts. Syntax is concerned with sentence structure. Together, morphology and syntax comprise the core of the grammar of a language. This course introduces students to the basic principles for the description of grammatical structure and the structure of words, and how they can be applied to describe English and other languages. The class is aimed at hands-on development of practical skills of morpho-syntactic analysis. It also focuses on description of contemporary English grammatical structures that pose problems for learners and teachers.

LING2202 Latin (3 credits)
Prerequisite: LING2201 Language and its structure I: Phonetics and Phonology
This course introduces the basic aspects of Latin language and ancient culture. It provides a basic exposure to the Latin elements of scientific language in order to facilitate understanding of special vocabulary and enable students to use appropriate language in communicating with both specialists and the general public. In this course students will become more conscious of words and their history, and will increase their vocabulary by studying how words are formed, by learning Latin elements in modern words, and by improving their ability to use a dictionary effectively.

LING3201 Introduction to the History of English (3 credits)
Prerequisite: LING2201 Language and its structure I: Phonetics and Phonology
Overview of major issues in the history of English, from Old English to current time: genetic relationships, changes in sound system, word and sentence structures, and pragmatics. Students will explore the main historical, cultural and linguistic changes within the English society, to understand how a language spoken on a small European island developed into a modern worldwide and extremely influential language.

LING3301 Foundations of Second Language Acquisition (3 credits)
Prerequisite: LING2201 Language and its structure II: Morphology and Syntax
The course will present important theories of second language acquisition and different methods for studying such acquisition. There will be special emphasis on the acquisition of English.

LING3302 The History of Writing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: none
An overview of the major writing systems of the world: Egyptian and Mayan hieroglyphs, Sumerian and Akkadian cuneiform, West Semitic consonantal scripts (abjads), East Asian scripts, runes, and Greek and Roman alphabets. This course has a considerable linguistic component supplemented by historical information about ancient languages and cultures.

LING3303 Introduction to Discourse Analysis (3 credits)
Prerequisite: LING2201 Language and its structure I: Phonetics and Phonology
The course will focus on aspects of discourse analysis both written (genres and genre analysis) and spoken (turn-taking, sequence organization). On completion of the course students will be able to identify and describe patterns in talk and text organization and reflect on possible applications of discourse analytic methodologies and findings to issues in the real world.

LING3304 Language Contact (3 credits)
Prerequisite: LING2201 Language and its structure I: Phonetics and Phonology
This course examines internal and external factors that trigger language variations and changes and the social attitudes associated with them. It provides students with a strong foundation on the scholarship in the field of contact linguistics, language variation and change, types of variations, the relationships between these variations and gender, ethnicity, religion, youth culture, and globalization.

LING4101 Bilingualism and Bilingual Education (3 credits)
Prerequisite: LING2201 Language and its structure I: Phonetics and Phonology
The course develops an understanding of important aspects of both individual and societal bilingualism which is used to analyze issues in education, assessment and policy contexts.

LING4102 Special Topics in Linguistics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: LING2201 Language and its structure I: Phonetics and Phonology
Intensive study of one or more topics in linguistics, through a combination of lectures, prescribed readings, and written analysis. The topics are confined to specialized teaching interests of faculty and thus will vary.

Scholarship opportunities
There are many opportunities for merit-based scholarships for Kazakhstani and international students.
While studying at KIMEP University, students may also apply for part-time positions available on the University campus.
Contact the Office of Financial Aid, if you would like to apply for scholarship.

Tuition & Fees

Career opportunities
Language degrees can open up opportunities in many areas:

  • Further education (research)
  • Education (teaching, educational management and consulting)
  • Professional, technical, and creative writing
  • Blogging, podcasting and social media
  • Digital content industry (e.g., web content creation and management, copywriting)
  • Translation and interpreting
  • Entertainment industry (e.g., game translator, subtitles and voiceover, screenwriting, editing, etc.)
  • Editing and publishing
  • Journalism and broadcasting
  • Public relation and HR
  • Marketing, advertising and PR
  • Private and government agencies
  • Business, logistics and sales
  • Training and educational software development agencies
  • Diplomacy and commerce
  • International organizations
  • Tourism and hospitality
  • Many others
Juldyz-Smagulova-6

Juldyz Smagulova, PhD

Associate Professor, Dean

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Ph.D. in Sociolinguistics

Dr. Juldyz Smagulova received her Ph.D. in Sociolinguistics from King’s College London (2012, UK), her Candidate of Philological Sciences from al-Farabi Kazakh National University (2004, Kazakhstan), and her MA in Linguistics from the University of Minnesota (1999, USA).

Her research interests and expertise include language bilingualism, language socialization, interactional sociolinguistics, language education and teacher training, language policy and planning. She co-edited the Language Change in Central Asia (Mouton de Gruyter, 2016); and co-authored the bilingual Kazakh-Russian Dictionary of Sociolinguistics (Arman PV, Kazakhstan, 2008) and the Kazakh language textbook for Russian-medium schools (Grade 5, Atamura, 2015). She has articles published in Journal of Sociolinguistics, International Journal of Bilingualism, and International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

Dr. Smagulova teaches graduate courses Introduction to Second Language Acquisition, Second Language Acquisition Research, Introduction to Sociolinguistics, and Introduction to Bilingualism as well undergraduate Academic English courses. She provides consulting in the areas of language planning and policy and conducts trainings for language teachers.

Publications:

  • Smagulova, J. (2017). Ideologies of language revival: Kazakh as school talk. International Journal of Bilingualism. Special issue “Ideology, agency, and imagination in multilingual families” edited by K. King and E. Lanza. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/13670069166849202015
  • Smagulova, J. (2019). (adapted with Bekzhanova G., Tutbayeva Zh., Tutbayeva N. and Akisheva R.) English Sciences: Student’s Book. Grade 10. Cambridge University Press.
  • Ahn, E. & Smagulova, J. (Eds.) (2016). Language change in Central Asia. Berlin, Germany: Mouton de Gruyter. [In the Contributions to the Sociology of Language series edited by Joshua Fishman].
  • Ahn, E. & Smagulova, J. (Eds.) (2016). Examining education change in urban Kazakhstan: A short spatial story. In Silova, I. & Niyazov, S. (Eds.), Globalization on the margins: Education and post-socialist transformations in Central Asia (2nd ed.). Charlotte, NC: Information Age.
  • Ahn, E., Bahry, S., Niyozov, S. , Shamatov, D. & Smagulova, J. (2016). Bilingual education in Central Asia. In O. García et al. (Eds.), Bilingual and multilingual education, encyclopedia of language and education, (3rd ed.) New York, NY: Springer International Publishing.
  • Smagulova, J. & Yernazarova, Z. (2016). Teaching Kazakh literature in Kazakh to Russian speakers: Symbolic value or effective pedagogy? In Bakić-Mirić, N. & Gaipov, D. (Eds.), Going Forward: Recent developments in higher education (pp. 127-136). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.


Karina Narymbetova (3)

Karina Narymbetovа, CSc

Assistant Professor, Associate Dean

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CSc, Assistant Professor
LC Deputy Director

Karina Narymbetova received her Candidate of Philological Sciences from al-Farabi Kazakh National University (2009, Kazakhstan), and her MA in TESOL from KIMEP University (2016).

Her research interests are principally in the area of literary studies, language education, and teacher training. Her research on comparative literary studies was partly done under JFDP fellowship as a visiting scholar in 2004-2005 at the WSU and University of Washington, USA. She is a self-directed, action-oriented professional with over 20 years’ experience in education who has developed a diverse teaching and training record. As a British Council Researcher Connect Trainer she has worked in a training and consultancy capacity with teachers and researchers. She has made keynote and workshop presentations for many national and international conferences on various aspects of teaching & learning.

She teaches both undergraduate and graduate students and believes it is important to understand different learning styles and strengths that students bring to class. Her favorite part of teaching is searching for approaches to help struggling students to cope with challenging material.

Publications:

  • Narymbetova, K. (2019, august). Elementary literacy program in Kazakhstan. Learning from the past for the future: Literacy for all. Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • Babeshko, Y. & Narymbetova, K. (2019, august). Are you “instateacher”? Academic literacy through social network sites. Learning from the past for the future: Literacy for all. Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • Narymbetova, K., Kulichenko Y. (2016). Literacy and Education: raising the intellectual potential of Kazakhstan. Symposium proceedings New trends in Science and Education. pp. 76-78
  • Narymbetova, K, (2016). Literacy Assessment and Evaluation Practices in Kazakhstan: Teachers’ Perspective. Paper presented at the international conference 3rd Baltic – 17th Nordic Literacy Conference. Turku, Finland
  • Narymbetova, K. (2016). Kazakhstan in the works of American writers. In Y.K. Kalizhanov (Eds), Kazakh-American Literary relations: Present and Future. pp. 82-115
  • Narymbetova, K. (2016). American image in Kazakh literature. In Y.K. Kalizhanov (Eds), Kazakh-American Literary relations: Present and Future. pp. 116-138
  • Narymbetova, K. (2016). Poetry of Kanapiyanov, Kenzheyev and Kodar in foreign publications. In Y.K. Kalizhanov (Eds), Kazakh-American Literary relations: Present and Future. pp. 212-231
  • Narymbetova, K. (2017, April). Literacy assessment and evaluation practices in Kazakhstan: teachers’ perspective. Paper presented at the international conference “Governance and Communication: Between Modernity and Post-Modernity”, KIMEP. Almaty

Karina Narymbetova,
Senior Lecturer, CSc
LC Deputy Director
Language Center, KIMEP University
2, Abai Ave., 050010, Almaty
tel # 7 727 270-43-71, ext 2617
nkarina@kimep.kz


Mr.-John-Sedwick-Westbrook

John Sedwick Westbrook , MFA, MA

Senior Lecturer

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John Westbrook holds an MFA in Creative Writing, with a concentration in poetry, from the University of Florida (2012, USA). He completed an MA in English at the University of Tulsa (2017, USA) and a BA in English at the Rice University (2009, USA).

His research interests include contemporary Anglophone poetry, poetry in translation, and creative writing pedagogy. He formerly served as assistant poetry editor for the American literary journal Subtropics and now serves as co-editor of KIMEP’s new humanities journal Language, Culture, Environment. His poems and translations have appeared in publications such as the Manchester Review, the New Criterion, and the Southern Review.

Mr. Westbrook teaches Academic Reading and Writing II and Introduction to Films.


Dr.-Vivienne-Ruth-Westbrook-2

Vivienne Ruth Westbrook, PhD

Professor

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Dr. Vivienne Westbrook received her Ph.D. in Reformation Biblical and Cultural Translation from the University of Manchester (1998), her M.Phil. in Renaissance Paratext (1995) and her M.Ed. in Educational Psychology (2000). She received her M.A. in Screenwriting from the University of London and The London Film School (2008). She holds a range of degree-level qualifications, including Business Studies (1984), Literary Studies (1992), English Literature and Language (1994), Psychology (2000) and Teaching English as a Foreign Language (2018).

Her current research interests and expertise include Renaissance culture and its subsequent transformations and adaptations, philosophies of humour, maritime environmental humanities and screenwriting. She is the General Editor of the two Routledge series: Humour in Literature and Culture, and Oceans, Seas and Shorelines: a natural and cultural environmental history. She has three books and two more series currently in process. She is an experienced international conference presenter and book and journal editor who has also published five books, sixteen articles and twelve book chapters. Her eighteen scripts for teaching Business English have been televised in China and Taiwan repeatedly. Her most recent work is Westbrook, Vivienne and Shun-liang Chao (Eds.), Humour in the Arts: New Perspectives(London and New York: Routledge, 1 August, 2018; 2019) and Westbrook, Vivienne, Shaun Collin, Dean Crawford and Mark Nicholls, Sharks in the Arts: from Feared to Revered(London and New York: Routledge, 17 May, 2018).

Dr. Westbrook has devised and taught numerous graduate courses, and supervised theses, in the areas of Renaissance Literature and Culture, Film Adaptation, Humour and Screenwriting. She is currently teaching undergraduate courses in Academic Writing, Creative Writing and Shakespeare for Business.


Dr.-Basem-Ibrahim-Malawi-Al-Raba

Basem Al-Raba’a, PhD

Assistant Professor

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Dr. Basem Al-Raba’a holds a dual Ph.D. in Linguistics and Near Eastern Languages and Cultures from Indiana University Bloomington (2017, USA). He completed his MA in Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at Indiana University Bloomington (2013, USA), his MA in Linguistics at Yarmouk University (2009, Jordan), and his BA in English Language at Yarmouk University (2004, Jordan).

His main area of research is Arabic syntax, but his work also focuses on the morphosyntax-semantics interface. He has been particularly working on reflexivity, reciprocality, transitivity, theta and Case marking, and participles. Other areas of interest include Arabic phonology and sociolinguistics.

Dr. Al-Raba’a teaches undergraduate and graduate courses, such as Language and its structure I: Phonetics and Phonology, Language and its structure II: Morphology and Syntax, Introduction to Language and Society, and Language Analysis for Language Instructors: Formal and Functional Grammars.


Askat Tleuov

Askat Tleuov

Assistant Professor

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PhD in Education

Dr Askat Tleuov received his PhD in Education from the University of Bath, UK in 2017. He has significant experience in English language teaching, working as an EFL teacher, lecturer, teacher educator and researcher in Kazakhstan and the United Kingdom.

Askat specializes in teacher cognition, teacher education, and teacher professional development. He has a particular interest in teacher knowledge, beliefs and perceptions; how these are enacted in practice; and the personal, educational and professional experiences which influence their development. Another strand of his research focuses on policy studies and politics of education. His recent research project involves the investigation of state and institution-wide research internationalization policies in Kazakhstan.

Dr Tleuov has been involved in teaching both undergraduate and graduate level courses that range from Academic English course to Introduction to Second Language Acquisition, Research Methods, and Learning Evaluation & Assessment in Language Education. He has supervised a number of Master level dissertations as well.


George Rueckert (5)

George Rueckert, PhD

Assistant Professor for English and Translation,
Director of Undergraduate and Graduate Programs

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PhD in Comparative Literature

(PhD University of Washington; MA Kansas State University; BA College of William & Mary)

Dr. George Rueckert is the Director of Undergraduate and Graduate Programs at the KIMEP Language Center and teaches all levels of English, as well as Russian-English translation.  He earned his BA and MA degrees in English and his PhD in Comparative Literature, specializing in Russian and German.  He worked for the European Union in Seattle USA and later taught English and translation in Germany before coming to Almaty in 2011.

His scholarly interests include translation and translation theory, semiotic and hermeneutic theory, verse translation and poetics, and 19th and 20th century literature and culture, particularly the Russian Romantic and Symbolist Periods, on which he has published several articles.  He has also taught seminars on Cold War culture and extensively in TESOL.  He is a working practical translator.

Dr. Rueckert regularly  teaches graduate courses in Formal and Functional Grammar and in Grammar in Social Context, as well as undergraduate courses in Academic English, translation, and literature.   He is married and has two small children.

Rueckert, George (2001).  “A.A. Bestuzhev-Marlinsky and the Critical Theory of the Novel.”  Nineteenth-Century Prose 28:1.  21-45.

Rueckert, George and Yuzefpolskaya, Sofiya (2006).  “No Empty Game:  Arsenij Tarkovskij’s Memorial Poems to N.A. Zabolotskij and A.A. Akhmatova.”  Slavic and East European Journal 50.2.  274-309.

Rueckert, George (2008).  “Translation as sentimental education:  Zhukovskij’s Sel’skoe kladbishche.”  Sign Systems Studies 36.2.  399-416.

 

Sagadiev, Kenzhegali (2012).  Reforms in Kazakhstan:  An Analytical View.  Trans. Rueckert, George.  Almaty:  Business Media.  ISBN:  978-601-7144-65-4.

Tarkovskii, Arsenii (2016).  “Selected Poems.”  Trans. Rueckert, George and Yuzefpolskaya, Sofiya. Bulletin of the Pushkin Society in America 1:2.  24-28.


Kara Kathleen Fleming (8)

Kara Fleming, PhD

Assistant Professor

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PhD in Linguistics, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China (2015)

M.St. General Linguistics and Comparative Philology, University of Oxford, UK

Kara Fleming is an assistant professor in the Language Center. She received her Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Hong Kong and her M.St. in Linguistics from the University of Oxford. Her research interests include language ideologies, language policy, multilingualism, and the relationships between language and ethnic and national identity. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in several international peer-reviewed edited volumes and journals, such as Language Ecology, and her monograph co-authored with Umberto Ansaldo, Revivals, nationalism, and linguistic discrimination: Threatening languages, is forthcoming with Routledge in 2020.

Dr Fleming teaches graduate courses including Introduction to Linguistics; Sociolinguistics; and Curriculum and Materials Development for TESOL; her undergraduate teaching includes Fundamentals of Linguistics; Language in Society, and academic English courses.

Selected publications:

Fleming, K., & Ansaldo, U. (forthcoming). Threatening languages: Revivals, nationalism, and linguistic discrimination. London: Routledge.

Fleming, K. (in preparation b). Poststructuralist approaches to language contact. In U. Ansaldo & M. Meyerhoff (Eds.), Routledge Handbook of Pidgin and Creole Languages. London: Routledge.

Fleming, K. (2019a). Language, scale, and ideologies of the national in Kazakhstan. In S. Dovchin & T. Barrett (Eds.), Critical Inquiries in the Studies of Sociolinguistics of Globalization. Multilingual Matters.

Fleming, K. (2019b). Who is “diverse”?: (In)tolerance, education, and race in Hong Kong. In J. Gube & F. Gao (Eds.), Education, ethnicity and equity in the multilingual Asian context. Springer.

Fleming, K. (2018). Transformative multilingualism?: Class, race and linguistic repertoires in Hong Kong. In J. Jaspers & L. M. Madsen (Eds.), Languagised lives: Fixity and fluidity in sociolinguistic theory and practice. London: Routledge.

Fleming, K. (2017). Hong Kong’s language ecology and the racialized linguistic order. Language Ecology, 1(1), 25–43. https://doi.org/10.1075/le.1.1.03fle

Fleming, K. (2015a). Constructing categories in a multilingual Hong Kong school. In M. O’Sullivan, D. Huddart, & C. Lee (Eds.), The future of English in Asia: Perspectives on language and literature (pp. 75–92). London: Routledge.

Fleming, K. (2015b). Ideology, identity, and linguistic repertoires among South Asian students in Hong Kong (Unpublished Ph.D. Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.


Konstantinos Kristofer Dimitriou (6)

Konstantinos Kristofer Dimitriou

Assistant Professor

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Assistant Professor

PhD in Education (University of Bath, UK), MSc Educational Research (University of Manchester), M.A. Teaching of English as a Foreign Language (University of Birmingham), Post-graduate Certificate in Learning and Teaching in Higher & Professional Education (Institute of Education, London)

Dr. Dimitriou has over twenty years of teaching experience in Academic Literacy and Applied Linguistics. His previous experience ranges from Queen Mary University of London to the European University Institute in Florence, Italy. His doctoral research investigation was on tertiary academic literacy processes. His present research is into gamification and intercultural communication. Konstantinos has previously studied and presented on the topics of bilingual language development, bilingual parenting, academic culture, feedback processes, tertiary student writing voice & critical writing, corpora in teaching, and academic plagiarism.

The range of graduate and undergraduate level courses which Dr. Dimitriou has taught include Research Methods, Thesis writing, Introduction to Second Language Acquisition Research and Writing for Law.


Maganat Shegebayev (1)

Maganat Shegebayev, MA TESOL

Assistant Professor

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DBA
KIMEP University, Kazakhstan, Almaty (2012)

Dr. Shegebayev is an assistant professor of KIMEP Language Center.  One of the Kazakhstan’s first-wave Bolashak International Scholarship awardees, he received a Master of Arts degree in TESOL from Fairfield University, USA; he then received a Doctor of Business Administration degree from KIMEP University.  Dr. Shegebayev has had twenty years of teaching and administrative experience and has been distinguished with the awards for academic and service achievements.  Three times in his pedagogical practice he has been awarded with the Certificate of Teaching Excellence.

In his activities, Dr. Shegebayev has served as a task force member to develop national program Intellectual Nation-2020 for the government of Kazakhstan.  He has authored and co-authored a number of international publications; he has been involved in various educational and research projects across Kazakhstan and abroad, which include collaboration with Indiana University (Bloomington, IN), Institute Aminuddin Baki (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia), George Washington University (Washington, D.C.), and Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (Oslo, Norway).  His research interests include topics related to linguistics, language policy and planning, critical thinking, business communication and educational management.

The range of graduate and undergraduate level courses which Dr. Shegebayev has taught includes Academic English, Critical Thinking, Educational Technology, Business Correspondence and Communication, General & Business English, and Foundation English.  He has also taught Business English certificate courses of the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI English for Business, levels 1, 2 and 3) to corporate clients from Central Asian countries.  As a part of the international teaching mobility, Dr. Shegebayev has been invited as a visiting professor to universities in Turkey and Hungary.

 

Selected research publications:

Shegebayev, M. (December, 2015).  Corpus Building in Kazakhstan: An Examination of the Terminology Development in the Oil and Gas Sector.  A chapter for Language Change in Central Asia, Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter Mouton. (E. Ahn & J. Smagulova (Eds.)), http://www.degruyter.com/view/books/9781614514534/9781614514534-010/9781614514534-010.xml

Ahn, E., Shegebayev, M. (in progress). In the Absence of Research Governance: Constructing a Contextually-Informed Research Ethic.  A chapter for Reimagining utopias: Theory and method for educational research in post-socialist contexts volume (I. Silova, N. Sobe, A. Korzh, & S. Kovalchuk (Eds.)).

Shegebayev, M., Seitova, A. (in progress).  A chapter on Kazakhstan in Perceptions of Educational Leadership and Culture: a Comparative Study book project coordinated by the National Institute of Educational Management and Leadership, Malaysia.

Shegebayev, M. (in progress).  Linguistic diversity and business communication in today’s Kazakhstan.  A  chapter for Sociolinguistic transition in former Soviet and Eastern Bloc countries: Recent developments in two decades after the regime change (P. Laihonen, M. Sloboda & A. Zabrodskaja (Eds.)) for Peter Lang’s series Prague Papers on Language, Society and Interaction / Prager Arbeiten zur Sprache, Gesellschaft und Interaktion, edited by Jiří Nekvapil, Tamah Sherman and Petr Kaderka.

Burkhalter, N. & Shegebayev, M. (2012) Critical Thinking as Culture: Teaching Post-Soviet Teachers in Kazakhstan.  The International Review of Education (Vol. 58, 1), http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11159-012-9285-5

Burkhalter, N. & Shegebayev, M. (2010).  The Critical Thinking Movement in Kazakhstan: A Progress Report.  Research in Comparative and International Education (RCIE), December issue, http://rci.sagepub.com/content/5/4/434.full.pdf+html

Smagulova, A., Shegebayev, M., Garkavenko, V. & Boolaky, M., (2009). Ethical Practices & Social Responsibility of Kazakhstani Tourism Business: A Pilot Study in the Tour Operator Sector. Central Asia Business Journal, November issue, Vol. 2, http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.455.9559&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

Contact Information:

Phone: (7-727) 270-43-67, ext. 2137

Office: #225/Dostyk

E-mail: magas@kimep.kz

Skype: maganatkz

DBA KIMEP University, Kazakhstan, Almaty (2012)


Su Jin Lee (1)

Su Jin Lee, PhD

Assistant Professor

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Short Biography

Dr. Su Jin Lee is an assistant professor of Language Center, KIMEP University. She received her Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 2009. Prior to joining KIMEP, she was a head researcher and director of Practical English Education Center at Hanyang University, South Korea. Her research interests focus on three interrelated areas of concerns: a) effective instructional methods to develop English as a Second/Foreign Language (ESL/FL) learners’ literacy skills; b) flipped learning strategies to engage ESL/FL learners; and c) young learners’ ESL/FL literacy development. Most importantly, Dr. Lee is passionate and enthusiastic about her teaching; she constantly improves her teaching skills to help students be knowledgeable and critical about content areas. Dr. Lee is currently teaching Academic Reading and Writing II, Academic English Speaking, Curriculum Design, Teaching English through Children’s Literature, Introduction to Second Language Acquisition and Second Language Acquisition Research.

Current Publications

  • Lee, S. J. & Lee, D. (2016). Effects of Corrective Feedback on Grammatical Accuracy of EFL Writing. Learner-centered Curriculum and Instruction, 16(11).
  • Lee, D. & Lee, S. J. (2017). Effect of Two Types of Feedback on Accuracy Development of L2 Writing. Learner-centered Curriculum and Instruction, 17(17).
  • Lee, S. J. & Yoon, H. K. (2018). Input talks: a case study of one experienced preschool teacher’s use of English input. Learner-centered Curriculum and Instruction, 18(16).
  • Lee, S. J. (in progress). Kazakhstani graduate students’ perceptions of flipped instruction. The Journal of Modern British & American Language & Literature 37(1).