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Modern Languages

About the program

In today’s global economy, having the ability to communicate in languages other than one’s own has become an increasingly valuable asset sought after by employers across the public and private sectors. Learning modern languages helps students to develop the complex set of linguistic, social and cultural skills, which enables them to understand not only the particular language and culture they are studying but also their own socio-cultural norms and values.

The College of Humanities and Education’s Modern Languages section offers courses in Russian, German and Chinese. It provides a full range of language offerings from beginning to advanced courses in a variety of languages from around the globe. In addition to development in the four basic language skills—speaking, listening, reading and writing—a major aim is to gain understanding of the diversity of human culture as represented by several of the world’s languages.

We offer an inclusive and interactive learning environment, encouraging students to engage with the course content and actively broaden their perspectives of the world.

Chinese language brochure

The College of Humanities and Education of KIMEP University and leading universities of China are recruiting applicants for Chinese and English Preparatory courses!

Our partners:
Beijing University of Language and Culture, Beijing
The university was founded in1962 and since then it has prepared 150 000 international specialists of Chinese language and culture from more than 180 countries. Outstanding politicians of Kazakhstan such as Kassymzhomart Tokayev and Prime Minister Karim Masimov were graduates of the Beijing University of Language and Culture.

Chinese University of Petroleum, Beijing
The university is one of the leading universities of the country. It is located in a picturesque region of tourist interest in Changping County of Beijing, the best place to study. More than 100 000 highly- qualified specialists have graduated from the university and created the basics of domestic oil, gas and chemical industries of China, so it is also called “the cradle of gas and petroleum engineering.”

The University of International Business and Economics, Beijing
The University was founded in 1951 and it is under the Ministry of Education. UIBE is involved in the “Project 221”, a state program aimed at promoting100 universities of China to become world-class universities. Currently, the university is a leader in the fields of economics, finance, management, law and others.

Xian Jiaotong University, Xian
The University is one of the oldest and best polytechnic universities in Xian and China as well. Xian Medical University and Shensy University of Finance and Economics joined Xian Jiaotong University in 2000. Currently, Xian Jiaotong University is on the list of 20 top universities of China. It is involved in the “Project 221”, a government-launched project to promote100 universities of China to become world-class universities, and “Project 985” to become one of 25 Priority Universities of China.

Faculty

George Rueckert (5)

George Rueckert, PhD

Assistant Professor for English and Translation,
Director of Undergraduate and Graduate Programs

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PhD in Comparative Literature

(PhD University of Washington; MA Kansas State University; BA College of William & Mary)

Dr. George Rueckert is the Director of Undergraduate and Graduate Programs at the KIMEP Language Center and teaches all levels of English, as well as Russian-English translation.  He earned his BA and MA degrees in English and his PhD in Comparative Literature, specializing in Russian and German.  He worked for the European Union in Seattle USA and later taught English and translation in Germany before coming to Almaty in 2011.

His scholarly interests include translation and translation theory, semiotic and hermeneutic theory, verse translation and poetics, and 19th and 20th century literature and culture, particularly the Russian Romantic and Symbolist Periods, on which he has published several articles.  He has also taught seminars on Cold War culture and extensively in TESOL.  He is a working practical translator.

Dr. Rueckert regularly  teaches graduate courses in Formal and Functional Grammar and in Grammar in Social Context, as well as undergraduate courses in Academic English, translation, and literature.   He is married and has two small children.

Rueckert, George (2001).  “A.A. Bestuzhev-Marlinsky and the Critical Theory of the Novel.”  Nineteenth-Century Prose 28:1.  21-45.

Rueckert, George and Yuzefpolskaya, Sofiya (2006).  “No Empty Game:  Arsenij Tarkovskij’s Memorial Poems to N.A. Zabolotskij and A.A. Akhmatova.”  Slavic and East European Journal 50.2.  274-309.

Rueckert, George (2008).  “Translation as sentimental education:  Zhukovskij’s Sel’skoe kladbishche.”  Sign Systems Studies 36.2.  399-416.

 

Sagadiev, Kenzhegali (2012).  Reforms in Kazakhstan:  An Analytical View.  Trans. Rueckert, George.  Almaty:  Business Media.  ISBN:  978-601-7144-65-4.

Tarkovskii, Arsenii (2016).  “Selected Poems.”  Trans. Rueckert, George and Yuzefpolskaya, Sofiya. Bulletin of the Pushkin Society in America 1:2.  24-28.


Kara Kathleen Fleming (8)

Kara Fleming, PhD

Assistant Professor

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PhD in Linguistics, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China (2015)

M.St. General Linguistics and Comparative Philology, University of Oxford, UK

Kara Fleming is an assistant professor in the Language Center. She received her Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Hong Kong and her M.St. in Linguistics from the University of Oxford. Her research interests include language ideologies, language policy, multilingualism, and the relationships between language and ethnic and national identity. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in several international peer-reviewed edited volumes and journals, such as Language Ecology, and her monograph co-authored with Umberto Ansaldo, Threatening languages: Revivals, nationalism, and linguistic discrimination, is forthcoming with Routledge in 2019.

Dr Fleming teaches graduate courses including Introduction to Linguistics; Sociolinguistics; and Curriculum and Materials Development for TESOL; her undergraduate teaching includes Fundamentals of Linguistics; Language in Society, and academic English courses.

Selected publications:

Fleming, K., & Ansaldo, U. (forthcoming). Threatening languages: Revivals, nationalism, and linguistic discrimination. London: Routledge.

Fleming, K. (in preparation a). Local identities in the ‘global’ city: Minorities and hierarchies of belonging in Hong Kong. International Journal of the Sociology of Language.

Fleming, K. (in preparation b). Poststructuralist approaches to language contact. In U. Ansaldo & M. Meyerhoff (Eds.), Routledge Handbook of Pidgin and Creole Languages. London: Routledge.

Fleming, K. (2019a). Language, scale, and ideologies of the national in Kazakhstan. In S. Dovchin & T. Barrett (Eds.), Critical Inquiries in the Studies of Sociolinguistics of Globalization. Multilingual Matters.

Fleming, K. (2019b). Who is “diverse”?: (In)tolerance, education, and race in Hong Kong. In J. Gube & F. Gao (Eds.), Education, ethnicity and equity in the multilingual Asian context. Springer.

Fleming, K. (2018). Transformative multilingualism?: Class, race and linguistic repertoires in Hong Kong. In J. Jaspers & L. M. Madsen (Eds.), Languagised lives: Fixity and fluidity in sociolinguistic theory and practice. London: Routledge.

Fleming, K. (2017). Hong Kong’s language ecology and the racialized linguistic order. Language Ecology, 1(1), 25–43. https://doi.org/10.1075/le.1.1.03fle

Fleming, K. (2015a). Constructing categories in a multilingual Hong Kong school. In M. O’Sullivan, D. Huddart, & C. Lee (Eds.), The future of English in Asia: Perspectives on language and literature (pp. 75–92). London: Routledge.

Fleming, K. (2015b). Ideology, identity, and linguistic repertoires among South Asian students in Hong Kong (Unpublished Ph.D. Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.


Su Jin Lee (1)

Su Jin Lee, PhD

Assistant Professor

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Short Biography

Dr. Su Jin Lee is an assistant professor of Language Center, KIMEP University. She received her Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 2009. Prior to joining KIMEP, she was a head researcher and director of Practical English Education Center at Hanyang University, South Korea. Her research interests focus on three interrelated areas of concerns: a) effective instructional methods to develop English as a Second/Foreign Language (ESL/FL) learners’ literacy skills; b) flipped learning strategies to engage ESL/FL learners; and c) young learners’ ESL/FL literacy development. Most importantly, Dr. Lee is passionate and enthusiastic about her teaching; she constantly improves her teaching skills to help students be knowledgeable and critical about content areas. Dr. Lee is currently teaching Academic Reading and Writing II, Academic English Speaking, Curriculum Design, Teaching English through Children’s Literature, Introduction to Second Language Acquisition and Second Language Acquisition Research.

Current Publications

  • Lee, S. J. & Lee, D. (2016). Effects of Corrective Feedback on Grammatical Accuracy of EFL Writing. Learner-centered Curriculum and Instruction, 16(11).
  • Lee, D. & Lee, S. J. (2017). Effect of Two Types of Feedback on Accuracy Development of L2 Writing. Learner-centered Curriculum and Instruction, 17(17).
  • Lee, S. J. & Yoon, H. K. (2018). Input talks: a case study of one experienced preschool teacher’s use of English input. Learner-centered Curriculum and Instruction, 18(16).
  • Lee, S. J. (in progress). Kazakhstani graduate students’ perceptions of flipped instruction. The Journal of Modern British & American Language & Literature 37(1).

Raushan Smagulova-150x150

Raushan Smagulova

Senior Lecturer

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CSc
Kazakh Ablay khan University of International Relations and World Languages, Almaty, Kazakhstan (2003)


Zhanar Tokhtarbay, PhD

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Yonjian Si, TEFL

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Course Descriptions

CHINESE LANGUAGE

CHN1301 Beginning Chinese (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisites: none

This course introduces the basic elements of the Chinese language in such a way as to enable students to engage in simple communication. It also provides a good foundation for further study of the language.  Practice is given in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Basic vocabulary and elementary grammatical structures are introduced. The course focuses on writing short compositions, dictations, delivering monologues, and intensive and extensive reading of graded books. Speaking and listening skills will be developed primarily through self-study assignments.

CHN1302 Elementary Chinese (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisite: CHN1301 Beginning Chinese or equivalent

This course follows the Beginning Chinese course and assumes knowledge of all the materials covered in CHN 1301.  This course is designed to provide students with a solid background in the four language learning skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. A special focus of this course is given to developing speaking skills as an integral part of the learning process.  Students will learn to communicate in simple terms about their house/flat and their immediate needs, and to describe and comment on their living situations and daily and leisure-time activities. Reading and listening activities will focus on a variety of topics from everyday life in Chinese-speaking countries. Students will also have an opportunity to learn about Chinese culture and traditions.

CHN1303 Pre-Intermediate Chinese (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisite: CHN1302 Elementary Chinese

This course is a continuation of CHN1302 Elementary Chinese course and is aimed at students who possess sufficient basic knowledge of phonetics, morphology and syntax of the Chinese language and have experience in everyday speech in Chinese. The course will help to improve students’ accents, to provide proper intonation, to improve their knowledge of Chinese grammar, and to introduce the basic features of functional styles of the Chinese language.

CHN1304 Intermediate Chinese (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisite: CHN1303 Pre-Intermediate Chinese

This course is designed for students with prior experience on listening, speaking, reading and writing Chinese at the elementary level. While students will be trained in all four skills, more emphasis will be given to reading and writing Chinese characters, expanding vocabulary, understanding Chinese culture. This course further develops students’ linguistic and cultural competence. In dealing with texts, students are guided to interpret, narrate, describe, and discuss topics ranging from real-life experience and personal memoire to historic events. To facilitate the study of the language, different aspects of Chinese culture and society will be introduced through group activities, multimedia programs, and research project throughout the course.

CHN1305 Upper Intermediate Chinese (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisite: CHN1304 Intermediate Chinese

This course offers Chinese for daily communication through intensive study and practice in written and spoken Chinese. Students will carry on conversations and participate in classroom discussions in Chinese on various topics associated with daily life and learn to write short passages in Chinese characters. This course also explores definitions of culture and analyzes the dynamic role of language in culture and culture in language, with an aim to foster cross-cultural awareness and self-realization while developing proficiency in Chinese.

CHN1306 Advanced Chinese (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisites: CHN1305 Upper Intermediate Chinese

This course continues the development of critical awareness by emphasizing the link between socio-cultural literacy and a higher level of language competence. While continuing to expand their critical literacy skills, students interpret texts related to Chinese popular culture, social change, cultural traditions, politics and history. Through linguistic and cultural comparisons, students understand more about people in the target society and themselves as well as about the power of language in language use to enhance their competence in operating between languages and associated cultures. This course aims to improve the ability to speak and understand Chinese, emphasizing correct pronunciation and intonation.

CHN2201 Conversational Chinese 1 (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisites: CHN1303 Pre-Intermediate Chinese

This course is designed for students who are of non-Chinese origin and were not raised in a Chinese-speaking environment, or who are of Chinese origin but do not speak Chinese and whose parents do not speak Chinese. This course develops students’ abilities in these two essential academic skills, while at the same time ensuring that listening is not a passive activity. Students improve their understanding Chinese speech in a variety of contexts, including lectures and less formal situations. They are exposed to a variety of dialects of Chinese and levels of formality.

CHN2202 Conversational Chinese 2 (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisites: CHN1304 Intermediate Chinese

This course continues to develop students’ conversational abilities through daily use of the target language. Students will engage in real-life situational role plays and engage in discussions of and make formal oral presentations of cultural and literary readings. This course promotes cultural awareness and communicative proficiency. This course will provide students with active command of both oral and written Chinese stressed; it emphasizes the development of conversational skills and vocabulary building with readings on everyday topics. This course provides training in advanced conversation and composition with readings that cover a range of topics on Chinese society, economics, history, politics, etc. It also covers reading and writing skills in modern Chinese, using authentic reading materials.

CHN2203 Linguistics of Chinese (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisite: LING1101 Fundamentals of Linguistics

This course provides an introduction to basic concepts in Chinese linguistics. It surveys the most important elements of the Chinese language, its structure, dialects, and writing system from contemporary linguistic perspectives. It also covers such topics as history of the language, dialectal variations, language and culture, language planning, language use in society, and Chinese computing. The course will be conducted mainly in lectures in combination with discussions of assigned readings, hands-on activities and in-class. Nature and structure of the Chinese language, covering structural characteristics, genetic and typological affiliation, standard Mandarin and Chinese dialects, Chinese writing system, history of the Chinese language, and cultural aspects. The course is conducted in English.

CHN3301 Survey of Chinese Literature (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisite: ENG2101 Introduction to Literary Studies

This course introduces traditional Chinese literature. Readings consist of both primary texts in English translation and secondary critical works. This course surveys major narrative and poetic genres, forms and works. Students with reading ability in Classical Chinese are encouraged to read the texts in the original, though class discussions will be based on the English translations.

CHN3302 Chinese for Business Settings (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisite: CHN1304 Intermediate Chinese

This course is designed to develop comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing of Chinese specifically related to the business environment. It is advanced Chinese course for those interested in contemporary Chinese business communications. The course covers various types of authentic business-related language materials, both oral and written. It emphasizes on cultural and linguistic aspects of the Chinese business communications. Objectives include a better understanding of the business world in China, its practices and trends, as well as development of language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

CHN3303 Chinese Calligraphy (2 credits; 3 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisite: CHN1302 Elementary Chinese

The course deals with Chinese computer program to search for, manage, develop and present information.  It is a review of the theory and art of Chinese calligraphy and practice in using a Chinese paintbrush to write Chinese characters. The course aims to develop the student’s computer skills, calligraphy skills and writing ability.

CHN3304 Chinese through Films (2 credits; 3 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisites: CHN1304 Intermediate Chinese

The course emphasizes both oral and textual communication through reading, writing, discussing and performing live theater in Chinese. It explores cultural aspects of Chinese-speaking worlds and the expression of ideational/emotional/social meanings in theatrical settings that simulate real life.

CHN3305 Chinese Language: Language of Mass Media and Newspaper (2 credits; 3 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisite: CHN1304 Intermediate Chinese

This course covers introduction to the language of Chinese media, including newspapers, magazines, TV, radio and the internet. It includes deep understanding of both the content of the selected materials and the linguistic characteristics of the language: its structures, vocabulary and style. The emphasis of the course is on improved reading comprehension through the study, analysis and discussion of a wide range of topics in the Chinese media.  The course is designed to develop Chinese language skills in conversation, reading, writing, and critical thinking in both practical and cultural situations through contemporary films, television programs, newspapers, magazines, and literary works. Selected important issues and themes in Chinese culture and history are considered.

CHN3306 Selected Topics in Chinese (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisite: CHN1304 Intermediate Chinese

The course is a survey of Chinese literature, theater, drama, popular fiction, film, television, music, and the internet. Subject emphasis varies from year to year.

 

GERMAN LANGUAGE

GER1301 Beginning German (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisites: None

This course introduces the basic elements of the German language in such a way as to enable students to engage in simple communication. It also provides a good foundation for further study of the language.  Practice is given in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Basic vocabulary and elementary grammatical structures are introduced. The course focuses on writing short compositions, dictations, delivering monologues, and intensive and extensive reading of graded books. Speaking and listening skills will be developed primarily through self-study assignments.

GER 1302 Elementary German 1 (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisites: GER 1301 Beginning German or equivalent

This course follows Beginning German and assumes knowledge of all the materials covered in GER 1301.  This course is designed to provide students with a solid background in the four language learning skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. A special focus of this course is given to developing speaking skills as an integral part of the learning process.  Students will learn to communicate in simple terms about their house/flat and their immediate needs, and to describe and comment on their living situations, and daily and leisure-time activities. Reading and listening activities will focus on a variety of topics from everyday life in the German speaking countries. Students will also have an opportunity to learn about German culture and traditions.

GER1303 Elementary German 2 (3 credits; 5 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisite: GER 1302 Elementary German 1 or equivalent

This course is a continuation of GER 1302 Elementary German 1. Students continue developing their communicative skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course content will include language and vocabulary used in situational contexts, as well as cultural and historical information about regions where German is spoken.  Emphasis will be placed on improving proficiency in oral communication and developing reading comprehension and fluent writing skills. Students also read short pieces on modern German culture, write compositions and make presentations on topics of personal interest. The course makes extensive use of technology (computer programs, the Internet, e-mail, videos) to promote and enhance students’ comprehension of the German language.

 

PROFESSIONALLY ORIENTED FOREIGN LANGUAGE (Undergraduate)

The Language Center offers a number of courses that focus on developing language skills needed for a variety of subject disciplines and professions.

ENG2101 Professionally Oriented Foreign Language (Economics) (2 credits; 3 credits of ECTS)

Prerequisites: Completion of all four Academic English courses: ENG/GEN110, ENG/GEN1120, ENG/GEN1110

and ENG/GEN1121

This course develops students’ ability to understand, use and apply the terminology and concepts of Economics in ways that will aid their academic advancement and contribute to their preparation for the world of work.